Archive for December, 2014

The Next New New Thing

In 1999 Michael Lewis told the story of “the new new thing” in terms of a single individual, Jim Clark, a “new-capitalist adventurer” in the words of the NY Times reviewer.  It was an exciting story but as we approach 2015, it seems dated, even quaint – dated because the new new things were individual companies – Silicon Graphics, Netscape, myCFO and Healtheon.

Today new new things are explosions of companies that seem to come in waves – waves such as cloud computing, Big Data and now what Shivon Zilis, of Bloomberg Beta, calls machine intelligence.  One wave often drives another, or at least enables it.  Machine Intelligence, perhaps the newest new thing, depends on massive data sets, so Big Data had to come first.

Shivon has done us all a service by scouring the startup world for artificial intelligence, machine learning and data-related technologies and created a landscape that puts them all in context.  Her diagram of the Machine Intelligence Landscape – she’s using “machine intelligence” as a unifying term for machine learning and AI – has five categories, each with multiple subcategories that suggest some of the areas where they will transform the way we work and multiple companies already implementing them (www.shivonzilis.com/machineintelligence):

  • Core Technologies

o   Artificial Intelligence – Deep Learning – Machine Learning – NLP Platforms – Predictive APIs – Image Recognition – Speech Recognition

  • Rethinking Enterprise

o   Sales – Security/Authentication – Fraud Detection – HR/Recruiting – Marketing _ Personal Assistant – Intelligence Tools

  • Rethinking Industries

o   AdTech – Agriculture – Education – Finance – Legal – Manufacturing – Medical – Oil and Gas – Media/Content – Consumer Finance – Philanthropies – Automotive – Diagnostics – Retail

  • Rethinking Humans/HCI (human-computer interaction)

o   Augmented Reality, Gestural Computing, Robotics, Emotional Recognition

  • Supporting Technologies

o   Hardware – Data Prep – Data Collection

Shivon recommends we focus on her core technology category for innovations at the heart of machine intelligence and suggests using the landscape to package some of the technologies into a new new industry application for those of us looking to build a company.  So spot the market opportunities, and you have an amazing map for innovation!  Even Harry Potter didn’t have one of these!

Making Sense of Change

We all live in perpetual information overload and a swirl of new technologies.  Continuous learning is no longer an option.  Learn or be  lost.  Keeping track of it all, fitting pieces together, is a challenge that seems to become increasingly impenetrable.  Now Brian Solis of Altimeter has given us a structure to help us sort through the emerging digital universe.  Thank you, Brian!

Cloud-based social, mobile and real-time technologies are the hub of the Brian Solis Wheel of Disruption.

In the first circle around the three core themes are the following seven emergent technologies and sectors:

  • Big Data
  • Apps
  • Ephemeral (content that disappears in a short time)
  • Geo-location
  • Messaging
  • Gamification
  • 2d Screen

The second circle contains seven more:

  • Wearables
  • Makers
  • Beacons
  • Internet of Things
  • Sharing
  • Virtual AI – AR (Artificial Intelligence & Augmented Reality)
  • Payments

Alongside the wheel are six themes implemented by these technologies::

  • Platforms
  • Alternative Currencies
  • Mass Personalization
  • Crowd Funding/Lending (and I would add, Sourcing)
  • Anonymous/Private web
  • Instant Gratification

Here’s Brian’s marvelous infographic: http://www.briansolis.com/2014/12/digital-transformation-year-review/

My head already feels clearer!  I hope yours will as well!

Innovation within the Enterprise:  GE

 

I heard Steve Liguori tell an amazing story about industrial innovation at GE the other day.  He was speaking at a Work-Bench event about disruptive innovation – something we’ve all heard a lot about.  And he had a new take on the subject in the context of rethinking how to run a big company.  How?  “Learn to beg,” advised Steve.  “Try disrupting your culture.”

The first step is a full-time person – a passionate advocate with consummate skills in marketing, persuasion – calling on key decision-makers, finding the ones with a big problem for GE customers and an open mind about how to solve it. That’s the begging part.

Steve at the time was Executive Director of Global Innovation and New Models at GE.  The problem he found was a seriously overweight jet engine part – the engine bracket – and as there are many of them, their weight has serious implications for fuel use.

Steve must have mastered the art of persuasion during the years when he headed marketing at blue-chip consumer goods companies.  I marvel at the heights to which he’s taken this to have done what he did.  He got GE management to agree to go outside the company to crowd source redesign of the jet engine bracket!

Collaborating with GrabCAD, a Cambridge startup, GE sent a challenge with heavy duty specs for blueprints to GrabCAD’s global community of more than a million engineers.  From this, GE received nearly 700 ideas, picked and tested the top ten thoroughly, and announced the winner – a design that cut the weight by 84 percent – from 4.48 lbs. to 0.72 lbs.  Who did it?    An engineering student in Jakarta with zero aerospace experience!

Imagine trusting GE’s brand for industrial innovation to engineers outside the company!  Imagine finding a solution beyond GE’s ability from a student in Indonesia.  It’s audacious!  It’s brave!  And I suspect crowd sourcing will be increasingly important in the future!

Media Heads Up for 2015: 12 Takeaways

Media visionaries looked to the future at the Gotham Media’s Digital Breakfast at Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz and made some predictions about social, mobile, TV and more for 2015 and beyond. Here are some highlights:

1. Ever-faster change – new things rise higher faster and fall faster.

2. Sensors all around that are passively aware of you. All cell phones have omnipresent computing.

3. Mobile payments. Apple’s entry will determine whether they make a difference. Most are safer than plastic, says John Abell, Senior editor, LinkedIn.

4. Continued migration of devices to mobile – even Facebook and video on mobile. Increasing importance of the second screen, though it’s still primitive. Monitors are losing to individual devices. “When the first screen gets boring, people go to the 2d screen,” reports Paul Berry, RebelMouse Founder and CEO

5. The steady growth of Facebook and mobile pose a challenge of how many pages per person can be sustained on your site.

6. Niche social networks will be big – a space for passionate sharing. (ED: Vertical networks were lumped into discussion of the category.) Niche networks will be combined with the 2d screen in the future – but with more than Twitter’s limited characters, predicts Berry.

7. People talking in a real voice as opposed to the institutional voice of mainstream media so that you hear individuals.

8. Infinite choice in content. “The quality level has been raised,” said Lockhart Steele, Editorial Director of Vox Media. “Now you have to do great stuff to get attention because there’s so much choice. . . The biggest challenge to media is the conversion to mobile. A lot of journalists are still writing in newspaper style.”

9. “Content is still king. It’s entirely defined by great talent,” according to Eric Wattenberg, Co- Head of Alternative Television at CAA.

10.“Traditional ads aren’t working. Only bots click. Millennials don’t even see the ads,” says Berry. At Vox, an in-house creative agency helps advertisers create native advertising. “The agency relationship is broken,” adds Steele. Every company has the opportunity and responsibility to be a media company, continues Berry. You need a product to be worth someone’s obsessing about it. Then put your money behind them. How do you measure social media effectiveness? Do viewers click? Share?

11 “But then we still don’t know how to measure TV,” Abell reminds us. “Yet, I don’t see how anything can supplant anything as unifying as TV.”

12.“The challenge for TV is how to get and keep an audience and grow it. It may be a combination of traditional TV with live elements in other forms of entertainment so that every week you’ll have to tune in and it’ll be fun and exciting to see what happens,” speculates Wattenberg.

Provenance: Gotham Media’s Digital Breakfast at Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz 12.9.14. Alan Sacks, moderator – Counsel, Frankfurt Kurnit Klein I& Selz PC Panelists: John Abell, Sr. Editor, LinkedIn Paul Berry, Founder and CEO, RebelMouse; Lockhart Steele, editorial Director, Vox Media, and Eric Wattenberg, Co-Head of Alternative television, CAA